Vintage Tom Candiotti interview from 1988

Here’s a vintage video of a Tom Candiotti interview. Candiotti, then with the Indians, discuses his pitching style the day following a 3-1 win over the Brewers on May 10, 1988.

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Have you gotten a Christmas gift for the sports lover in your family?

Well, Christmas is a couple of weeks away, so have you bought a gift yet for the sports lover in your family?

If not, then why not one of these two books?

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The hockey book is about the Boston-Montreal rivalry from 1988-1994, when the Bruins won five of the six series played between the two clubs, ending a streak of 18 consecutive playoff series losses to the Canadiens. Click to purchase this book here.

The baseball book is a biography of Tom Candiotti, the former knuckleball pitcher who pitched in the 1980s and 1990s. Candiotti won 151 major-league games and this book highlights his career. You can purchase this book here.

Get them for the sports lover in your family! 🙂

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Radio appearance on TSN1040 (Oct. 13, 2017)

I meant to spend some time writing about how Corey Kluber went from stud in September to flop in October as the Indians lost 3-2 to the Yankees in the ALDS. Just didn’t get a chance to.

I mean, Kluber was lights out in September and surpassed 200 innings in his final start of the year, making it four years in a row that he’d gone 200+ innings for Cleveland. So, Tom Candiotti’s status of being the last Indians pitcher with five consecutive 200-inning seasons with Cleveland will be in jeopardy in 2018.

As a Candiotti fan, I wished Kluber’s two abbreviated outings in the ALDS would have come in September, so he might not have cracked 200 innings for the fourth straight year! But oh well.

And I can also say something about this “advantage” that division winners have. What advantage is it if you win your division and then have to sit for days before the playoffs begin? I don’t think players are used to that since you play every day during the season! I would think it takes some edge off your team if you’re forced to sit for days before starting the postseason – but the wild-card games are for TV, so that’s not going to change.

Oh yeah, I was on TSN1040 on Friday, Oct. 13, to talk baseball with Rob Fai. Here’s the program in its entirety – I came on at the 41-minute mark.

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If only they’d scored more runs….

On this day, September 17, in history, 24 years ago, the Colorado Rockies set an attendance record and also pounded Dodgers knuckleballer Tom Candiotti in the process.

In that September 17, 1993 game, Colorado ripped Candiotti for seven runs–all earned–in just 1.2 innings. Candiotti’s ERA went from 2.58 to 2.88, and his shot at the NL ERA title was essentially done.

Not many people remember this, but going into September, his ERA was 2.43, which lead the major leagues. The Dodgers that year, however, averaged 2.81 runs of support in his starts, according to Baseball-Reference.com, so he was only 8-10 on the year.

Interestingly, though, teammate Kevin Gross was 13-13–despite an ERA of 4.14. How did he manage 13 wins? Well, according to Baseball Reference, the Dodgers gave him an average of 5.22 runs of support in his starts.

Imagine being on the same team but getting completely different kinds of run support!

If the Dodgers had scored five runs in each of Candiotti’s starts in 1993–the same number of runs they averaged for Gross–he could have gone 24-7. He finished with a 3.12 ERA, seventh-best in the NL.

Hey, 24-7 wouldn’t have been a stretch. That same year, the Giants’ John Burkett was 22-7 with a 3.65 ERA. Tom Glavine was 22-6 with a 3.20 ERA. Consider that from May 1 to August 25, Candiotti had a 1.85 ERA in 22 starts–that’s a lot of games he should have won. Instead, he was just 8-2 with 12 no-decisions.

candiotti 93 stats

Anyway, here’s a video of him striking out the Phillies’ Mariano Duncan from April of that season.

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Overly critical and uninformed folks in the Toronto media…

Up in the press box at Vancouver’s Scotiabank Field at Nat Bailey Stadium, people talk baseball and reminisce a lot.

A few days ago, I was sitting there working the scoreboard when the name “Perkins” was mentioned – a Toronto-based baseball columnist who had since retired.

I perked up when I heard that name and started ranting about that guy.

This goes back to Blue Jays baseball in the mid-’80s, when Toronto lost its first ever ALCS to Kansas City, blowing a 3-1 series lead. In 1987, the Blue Jays coughed up a huge lead in the final week of the season to lose the division to Detroit. In 1989, they made it back to the ALCS but were destroyed by the eventual champion A’s.

So, two trips to the playoffs and two exits in the first round (in those days, only the division winners advanced and played in the LCS for the right to go to the World Series).

In 1991, they made it to the ALCS again despite losing ace Dave Stieb for the rest of the season back in May. Tom Candiotti, the knuckleballer, was brought in and he was outstanding in his 19 starts, pitching to a 2.98 ERA but just a 6-7 mark due to poor run support.

They faced the Twins in the ALCS, a team that had never before lost a playoff game at the Metrodome. In 1987, the Twins had won all their games at home en route to their World Series victory.

Candiotti didn’t pitch well in Game One and the Blue Jays lost 5-4. They won the next game with rookie Juan Guzman pitching.

So, series tied 1-1.

The Blue Jays were now going back home for three straight games at SkyDome. Game Three, Jimmy Key pitched, and they lost in extra innings. Game Four, Todd Stottlemyre started and they were blown out. Game Five, Candiotti started, and left with a 5-2 lead (and inherited runners on base). Mike Timlin, Duane Ward, and David Wells all failed in relief. Jays lost 8-5.

Naturally, the Toronto media, led by that guy “Perkins,” blamed Candiotti for the series loss.

Excuse me? You’re tied 1-1 going home for three straight games, and you blame the Game One starter? In the NLCS that year, Tom Glavine lost Game One for Atlanta vs. Pittsburgh. Guess what? The rest of the starters – Steve Avery and John Smoltz – stepped up and the Braves won in seven!

Did Stottlemyre step up? No. Did Key win his start? No.

And yet Perkins and the rest of the Toronto media – there were plenty of them who did the same thing – assigned blame to the Game One starter.

Did these guys even know baseball? You blame the Game One starter when the series was tied 1-1 and the team lost three straight? What planet were these media people from?

Of course, over the years, when Toronto missed the playoffs and more recently, when the Jays made it back, Perkins and the rest of these idiots bring up Candiotti’s name as the reason they lost in 1991.

Totally biased and ridiculously stupid, these guys were.

Anyway, that was my rant that day in the press box when someone brought that name Perkins up. How dumb were those guys covering baseball in Toronto? Really dumb.

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